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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with tim geithner, a lot of people have said he is one of the reasons why things are as shaky as they are righ
] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered i
changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ i love the fact that quicken loans provides va loans. quicken loans understood the details and guided me through every step of the process. i know wherever the military sends me, i can depend on quicken loans. i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who ar
. and i can. it gives me energy. it gives me hope. and i need lots of hope right now. >> press two. >> but suddenly, a new crisis is brewing. >> the balance remaining on your claim is $0. thank you for calling the unemployment insurance offices. good-bye. >> diane's unemployment benefits seemed to have run out a month earlier than expected. she calls a case manager to find out what's going on. >> she said, well, you're out of benefits. you have run out, hon. she called me sweetie. she was chomping on gum. and she said, you should have paid better attention to things. >> there's just one month left on the family's rental assistance. >> are you guys willing to consider an additional month? >> you know, i can't promise either way. more things will have to be either cut back or find other ways to supplement your income with the unemployment running out. eight months of assistance has been i think a lot. and i haven't really seen as many changes or moving forward as i guess i expected. >> right. okay. >> our case worker kind of confronted me, you know, you have to look at your budget mo
deal of energy or strategy to how to mobilize obama's army from 2008. it was quite a crowd r -- crowd, and it was muscular and ready, sort of where do we go? you look at the 2 # million people leaping and cheering in the mall in 8 degrees. they were looking for direction for the model. we see that everywhere. of course, what's interesting is you see that cropping up in the summer, in the middle of health care, the tea party rises from the loins so to speak from the republican party, ahijacked that debate. the administration lost control of it, wrestle it back after scott brown and after they lost their majority in january the following year, but then, of course, occupy wall street adds welcoming up -- as well coming up. obama keeps them at arms' length for the most part. i think the thinking, and i hear this from progressive activists over the last few days is a bit of a -- what's that line, lbj, you know, says to various leaders of his day, make me do it. you know, -- marlin -- martin luther king and others, make me do it. people are getting a system that obama and the signaling syst
before, during and after chemotherapy. with these images to measure how the brain is using energy, the researchers discovered chemotherapy sets up very specific changes in several key parts of the brain that control memory and decision making. >> what am i going to get done today? what do i need to get at the grocery store? what am i going to have for dinner? >> reporter: increasingly, hospitals and doctors are trying to make patients aware of the problem. >> it is helpful for patients to understand they're not alone in this experience. that this does happen to a segment of the population. at present we can't predict who's at greatest risk for them. >> fortunately, the effect usually fades with time. better understanding of the impact on patients like jodi may lead to ways to treat or prevent the symptoms. robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next here tonight, the actual research about getting along with the in-laws. >>> veteran new yorkers didn't know what they were looking at last night. a lot of them were worried someone had gone and tarted up the dignified empire state b
jobs in our communities and looking -- i think, for example, energy development, what tolidine energy development. with the vast amount of tribal land in indian country, we had 15% of opportunities within indian country. we need to build the capacity and develop those kinds of ventures that will be helpful. host: colleen in wisconsin, you're on the air. oops, you are no longer on the air. i apologize -- could the producers get off the phone down there so that i can get back on? colleen from wisconsin. caller: can you hear me? host: we are listening. caller: ok. i now reside in the middle of wisconsin, but i was raised in ashland the field area -- the ashland bay field area in the extreme middle part of the state. with the oncoming legislative session, the last session we had a big fight over mining operations that were going to be pushed through that area near pearly, wisconsin, near ashland, wisconsin, which was supposed to produce 10,000 jobs. but the main concern of the indian leadership there was contamination of the brown water -- of the ground water, hunting land. how much do yo
. this is not just a spectator sport. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. >> they sit around in their >> announcer: tiffany miller. >> i cook a -- >> stephanie mill err. >> i can't cook a thanksgiving dinner. all i can cook is toast. >> stephanie: republican party 2012. toast! 1-800-steph-12. hi sue. >> caller: happy thanksgiving, everybody. i have three quick points. i am a cancer which makes me a moody bitch. number two, i really wish you all a very happy holiday and a happy thanksgiving and book of mormon is great. you'll have a ball. >> stephanie: we can't wait. we have a date. don't forget my wrist corsage. >> don't forget my boutonniere. >> drink mojitos. mom is home from the hospital. healing well. i had a lovely mojito and i was feeling no pain. but finally here's the thing. a direct member of my family, in my immediate family worked for susan rice as her research assistan
, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just making her comfortable. one night britta told me about a tradition in denmark, "when a person dies," she said, "someone must open the window so the soul can depart." i smiled and squeezed her hand. "not tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> cnn newsroom starts at the top of the hour. fred is here. >> per usual, our legal guys will be here tackling the most fascinating cases of the week beginning with a case in coral springs. a family who has a child with down syndrome has a cute litt
had enough energy to play a game of rugby. >> this is the first thanksgiving game. so we're really excited about it. we've got a lot of participation from folks that normally don't play. so yeah. it's a great time. >> the army captain said he's thankful for the good food, but he definitely misses his family. as they all do. those are your headlines. >> thank you so much. coming up next on the show, real estate guru bob massi is dipping into his mail bag for you this thanksgiving. >> then tossed in the garbage and left to die, the dog survived and this morning we're giving thanks. >> oh. >> for all the folks that made it happen and what you can do to help joey, coming up. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would y
news at energy and metals and go to sharon epperson at the nimax. >> many commodities on friday had the best performance in a month and we see a subdued marketplace and a pullback across the board here. we're looking at oil prices that are lower. the truce is holding between israel and hamas and that's something that's perhaps putting some pressure on prices. the cease-fire holding and the fact that we are looking at some weakness here in the euro and traders continue to eye what is happening there in the eurozone over the greek debt deal. we're also watching of course the protest that erupted over a three-day period in egypt and that could lend some support to the oil price going forward. we are watching metals market which is somewhat lower here. gold prices after the significant rally on friday seem to be in this range between 17.46 and 17.55. we're looking at copper prices and there's a lot ahead for this market to watch namely what's happening in china and pmi data coming out later in the week. the big story in commodities definitely the slide that we're seeing in natural gas d
, over 60, regular, diet, all natural energy. >> do they have brands i've heard of? >> crystal light that's my favorite! i don't spin this much to drink regular. i drink crystal light. they are better for you flavors with no high fructose corn syrup or as par tame. >> right! >> stephanie: it's like 25 cents a can if you have it. do it! check it out at bed bath and beyond macy's khol's. >> fun wow! >> stephanie: is it time for a next vacation. >> we're going to be punchy the entire month of december. >> stephanie: it's been a long election. right back on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: on the "stephanie miller show" in suburban america this morning. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly da
the viewers are. let's check in now with latest moves on energy and go up to jackie at the nimax. >> we're watching oil prices this morning flat to slightly higher. wti is holding above $87 a barrel and traders are telling me we'll be in an affected range for the next couple of weeks absent big catalyst like the middle east. we have the cease-fire but we have to see how long it lasts. that's a trigger to the upside. trigger to the downside could be strength in the dollar and also data coming out of the u.s. we'll have to keep a close eye on that. fiscal cliff is a wild card. traders don't expect imminent news. we're keeping an eye on the metals complex. gold is seeing strength on euro strength today. generally a cautious tone here for the traders who are on the floor today. back over to you, david. >> all right. thanks very much. we want to turn our viewers attention now to a pitch battle going on for quite sometime but reaching a tipping point between the government of argentina led by its president and new york based hedge fund manager paul singer well known the man who runs elliott c
affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. ♪ >>> we're really feeling it here this morning on "starting point." check out the new led lighting system on top of the empire state building in new york. lights can produce more than 16 million colors siem ul cast with aalicia keys. we're playing -- >> jay-z. got to give it up. last night brooklyn nets beat the new york knicks. great job by brooklyn nets. >> i saw the nets with rick barry at the garden. that's a long time ago. >> that's a long time ago. >> want to make rick barry your end point, that's okay. someone else bring it. >> washington editorial saying republicans basically have to accept a world where not only revenue but tax rates go up is an absolute turning
. but i hope we can marshal the energy and create -- i think there's an extraordinary opportunity. i think we can turn that longevity paired docs into a fast payoff and i think the analogy is the movement of so many women into new roles in the 60's and 70's. at that point we were thinking as a society, this is going to be a zero-sum proposition. how we accommodate all this talent. we will simply displace men and end up at the same place that we started only with a lot of conflict along the way. now we know we would be never be competitive without that enormous source of talent. down the road we will feel the same way about the segment of population. i think there'll be lots of surprises as well. we can't write off the talent and experience of this group but even more we tend to underestimate the creativity and and -- david gallas and he studied creativity said creativity across the life course. he said the value of every significant painting that was sold over the last 100 years and as they looks at the patterns of this artwork more strongly than anything else was that the most valuable wo
. the move comes as canada gets close to its decision on whether to approve the transaction. the energy companies say discussions with the committee are still in progress, and of course they had to file approval because they have extensive operations in the u.s. gulf of mexico. >>> "the wall street journal" reporting that virtue is emerging as the frontrunner to buy knight capital. they would possibly sell off parts of that business. finally, we can't get away from the story of twinkies. the bakers union of hostess brands wants a bankruptcy judge to appoint a chapter 11 trustee to ensure an orderly winddown. the union is saying it objects the allowing incumbent management to supervise the lick wi addition. have you finished your twinkies? >> no, we're back to saving them now. we need to talk, because i read a piece in the journal today, which gave me a new insight into -- >> the jenkins piece? fantastic piece. >> it's not the bakers. it's the teamsters. it's that distribution system which we heard about. one guy can deliver -- i think you have to deliver of wonder bread, each slice indi
by the senate which gives them constitutional legitimacy and they get new people, ideas, and energy. all of these things are positive aspects of the spoils system, but the downside is that it is an overwhelming task, especially at the beginning of a new administration. there is quality control that is difficult and the lack of continuity at the top of the executive branch is problematic. the number of political appointees has been increasing and has doubled since 1960. there are more programs and agencies, of course, and presidents want more control. the office feel they can't really trust civil servants that might be committed to the previous administration. richard nixon who said that they are dug in establishment terrorism's. he wanted more of his own appointees, but this is a bipartisan thing and each president wants more control. they think having their own appointees is going to help them. the top levels of the government have not changed significantly. departments have increased by about five, but the lower levels have increased considerably. as you can see, there is a lot of over
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
of the 21st century. this is where all the economic energy is, where all the dynamism is. what we're seeing in asia is what we saw a century ago. china, korea, vietnam, the tectonic plates are moving. the united states has to be involved. we've got to give these countries some reassurance. they have to understand they have an alternative to simply appeasing china. on the other hand, we don't want to set up a new cold war with china and for them to start acting recklessly. this is going to be the extraordinarily difficult balancing act, and the administration's going to have to figure out a way not to abandon the middle east but to put a ceiling on what we do in the middle east so we can do more at home but also so we can do more in this part are the world that's going to shape history a hell of a lot more than the middle east. >> aside from the economic issue, though, the nuclear proliferation has existential issues. what is your sense of where we will be with pakistan, afghanistan after the withdrawal? >> well, pakistan, i think, is the single toughest problem. we talked about iran for ten
for wind energy. >> can't do that. >> everybody puts their hand up this is mine. >> it's less difficult, and -- >> cap you get to keep what you want. >> it's going to affect the high end, at 50,000 it wouldn't affect -- >> steve, what do you think about the $50,000 cap proposal or another number? >> i think the cap proposal has some merit. in the real world you probably end up exempting charitable. apart from what the head of the red cross is, charities see this as potentially devastating. do you want it to apply to everybody or only with people with income above $250,000. >> if it's 50,000 or 28% cap of adjusted gross you end up exempting people with lower incomes because they don't use that much. >> there are people, there's actually two different things. the $50,000 cap there are not that many people but some people who would use it. >> how can you use more? >> state and local taxes, health care, all this stuff if you put it in there. >> there are some arguments that health care shouldn't be exempted anyway. >> i understand but there's also a view at least amongst some of us that the
papers, vigor. the document energy, dispatch, secrecy, someone who could respond to a crisis at the time when there is a crisis, the constitution -- the articles of the federation meant there was a lot of debate, but nobody really to take charge. so they knew they knew they needed both, but they were also very concerned that the separation of power. a think it's fair to say that in the course of the 225 years since then, since that kind of invented or perhaps improvised the presidency is a better word, that there is the nature mentis change in the office. obviously, every president from washington on has taken certain powers for himself. sometimes congress has resisted. the pendulum has swung back and forth if we could go down the list. executive order, signing statements, the war powers. all of these things were fought far beyond what most of the founders would have been vision. but that is the way that democracy and the republic had evolved over these 225 years. >> host: kenneth davis, in your career, have you ever been a teacher at all? >> guest: no, i haven't. somebody called the pro
talk a little about was natural gas and fracking and how it might change our energy and we're look about bright lights. can you give us a bright light and perhaps that and why we should be optimistic. >> the bright lights are here, one, you'd rather have america's problem as serious as they are in those than any of the major companies we compete with, certainly europe and japan. i would argue china, as well. two, we are the cutting edge of change in a knowledged economy. our universities are the best universities. we're the country that people from all over want to come to. think about any of the great entrepreneurs of this era and there's a very good chance you're thinking of an american. three, as you say mark, we have a remarkable competitive position in natural gas. we've got huge amounts of it that can be produced at very low cost. we had a very important economic decision to make. should we keep it captive and use the lower costs to support american manufacturers to support other american businesses? or should we allow it to be exported, improving our competitive position, ge
think we have to become more smarter and efficient with the resources. whether money, energy, time, motion associated with every single component of the educational institution. given the reality, every single component of the educational institution has to be evaluated based on what the return on investment of educational dollars including football. okay. so how do you do that? the way you do that is we have to go to the justification we have been using as been century. you have primary justification laws. part of it was to socialize in immigrant work force. the other major part of it is the great industrialist turn of the century were interested in football as a way to train work force for the industrial economy. they weren't folks who were physically fit. took direction, were obedient, there wasn't much room for lot ofy thinking on ate semibelie line. okay is it primary justification -- we no long -- [inaudible] okay. the other justification that we have used for years and i do believe this justification is that football is a way -- it's an educational tool bilged character. jus
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)